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lascasartoris:

Easter Sunday (top-bottom)

  1. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  2. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  3. Harlem 1943 by Weegee
  4. South Side, Chicago 1941 by Russell Lee
  5. South Side, Chicago 1941 by Russell Lee
  6. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  7. South Side, Chicago,. 1941 by Edwin Rosskam
  8. Harlem 1940 by Weegee
  9. Harlem 1955 by William Klein
  10. Harlem (W. 117th St. and Seventh Ave) 1939

(via vintagegal)

tacanderson:

The science of ‘Transcendence’ isn’t just fiction—it’s terrifyingly real

Transcendence is based directly on the principle of singularity, the moment when technology surpasses humanity. In fact, Dr. Caster, the film’s protagonist, even states as much in the trailer, asking an audience to, “Imagine a machine with the full range of human emotion. It’s analytical power will be greater than the collective intelligence of every person in the history of the world. Some scientists refer to this as the singularity. I call it Transcendence.”
Over the years, the biggest proponent of the singularity has been noted author, scientist, and futurist Ray Kurzweil, who freely acknowledges that, “Science fiction is the great opportunity to speculate on what could happen.” Although a notorious eccentric, Kurzweil’s thinking has led to numerous technological innovations over the last few decades. Recently, he partnered with Google (yes, Google) in their efforts towards “using techniques of deep learning to produce an artificial brain.”

tacanderson:

The science of ‘Transcendence’ isn’t just fiction—it’s terrifyingly real

Transcendence is based directly on the principle of singularity, the moment when technology surpasses humanity. In fact, Dr. Caster, the film’s protagonist, even states as much in the trailer, asking an audience to, “Imagine a machine with the full range of human emotion. It’s analytical power will be greater than the collective intelligence of every person in the history of the world. Some scientists refer to this as the singularity. I call it Transcendence.”

Over the years, the biggest proponent of the singularity has been noted author, scientist, and futurist Ray Kurzweil, who freely acknowledges that, “Science fiction is the great opportunity to speculate on what could happen.” Although a notorious eccentric, Kurzweil’s thinking has led to numerous technological innovations over the last few decades. Recently, he partnered with Google (yes, Google) in their efforts towards “using techniques of deep learning to produce an artificial brain.”

(via emergentfutures)

The High-Tech Soldiers of the Future Are Here

singularitarian:

Those troops you saw in science fiction movies as a child are now real. A few years ago, many countries recognized a need to upgrade the individual infantryman and thus started their own “future soldier” programs. Most of them completed more or less the main priority objectives, applying them to some of their elite troops and special forces, bringing together commercial, off-the-shelf technology and state of the art military gear and equipment.